Survival RV, how much should you pay


Travel Trailer RV parked in camp site.


Ok, your ready to buy an RV for camping and bugging-out, but you’re not sure of its value. What do you do?

Step 1 – Go to https://www.nadaguides.com

Step 2 – In the top menu bar click on “RVS”

Step 3 – Click on the class of RV you want to buy

Step 4 – Select the manufacturer of the RV you want to buy from the drop-down list

Step 5 – Select the year and scroll down the page to select the model you want to buy

Step 6 – Enter your zip code

Step 7 – Click on “Get Base Pricing”

Step 8 – You can now look at the Suggested List Price for when the RV was new, the Low Retail Price, and Average Retail Price.

To get the wholesale price a dealer might pay for a used RV subtract 10% off the low retail figure. For example, 10% off $46,000 is $40,000.

To get the retail price for a used RV take 10% off the Average retail price. For example, 10% off of $55,450 is $49,905.

These numbers will give you a good base to work off of when negotiating a deal with a dealer or private seller. You might want to go higher for a great RV with low mileage and added options or less for an RV without options and some defects.

If you do not know anything about RVs and how they work I would suggest paying for an RV inspection if buying used. They charge around $300 to $1000 depending on the type and location of RV.
Learn more here: https://nrvia.org/standards-of-practice/

When buying a new RV, dealers will typically come off the MSRP 20 to 30 percent or more. For example, 30% off $93,863 is $65,704.10. The MSRP is just a sale price suggested by the manufacturer for the dealers to use. Never pay MSRP!

Don’t be afraid to go low, because dealers are sure as hell not afraid to go high.

Below is an excellent video from UltraMobility which takes you through the typical negotiating process.



Be sure to read my first post in this “Survival RV” series


As always, this is just my opinion.

Timothy Scott

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